When you just can’t get enough pumpkin: A pumpkin cookie recipe

A few weeks ago a friend made us a chicken pot pie. It was delicious, and I definitely need to get the recipe so we can have it again.

I have had the empty pie plate sitting here waiting for a chance for me to make something to fill and return it. I knew just what I wanted to bake, and I finally had time to make them: pumpkin cookies.

While they were cooking, Daniel came running into the kitchen to peek through the oven’s glass doors.

“Do they really look like pumpkins?” he asked.

No, no, they don’t. And he’s not the first child in my life to be disappointed to see these shapeless mounds on the cooling racks instead of grinning jack-o-lanterns. But if you like not the look, but the taste of pumpkin, these are for you. Just make sure you bake enough. I almost always make a double batch so we have some to share.

Ingredients

½ cup butter

1 cup canned pumpkin

1 tsp vanilla extract

1 tsp baking powder

1 tsp baking soda

1 tsp cinnamon

1 ½ cups sugar

1 egg

2 ½ cups flour

1 cup semi-sweet chocolate chips (optional)

Directions

Cream the butter and sugar. Beat in the egg, pumpkin, and vanilla. Stir in the cinnamon, baking soda, and baking powder. Stir in flour and mix well. It will be a strange orange mess, but forge ahead. Add the chocolate chips, if desired.

Drop by teaspoonful onto a greased (or parchment papered) cookie sheet. Bake at 350 for about 15 minutes. Cool on a wire rack. Makes about 6 dozen small cookies or fewer large, soft cookies that take more like 20 minutes to cook. We tend to make ours larger here. I don’t think there’s a wrong way to bake a pumpkin cookie.

Besides, with a pumpkin cookie in hand, how can you feel anything but grateful?

Enjoy!

 

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Rita Buettner

Rita Buettner

Rita Buettner is a wife, working mother and author of the Catholic Review's Open Window blog. She and her husband adopted their two sons from China, and Rita often writes about topics concerning adoption, family and faith.

Rita also writes The Domestic Church, a featured column in the Catholic Review. Her writing has been honored by the Catholic Press Association, the Maryland-Delaware-D.C. Press Association and the Associated Church Press.